Posts Tagged ‘Diabetes’

An interesting article and report! This is how information technology is helping transform healthcare systems: http://goo.gl/hYpr6. “The report was the result of three meetings held in the summer and fall of 2010, bringing together researchers, computer scientists, privacy experts, clinicians, healthcare administrators, health IT professionals, representatives of patient advocacy groups, healthcare policymakers, and other stakeholders.”

The goal is to bring about the “emergence of a digital infrastructure that allows data collected during activities in various settings — clinical, research, and public health — to be integrated, analyzed, and broadly applied (‘collect once, use for multiple purposes’) to inform and improve clinical care decisions, promote patient education and self-management, design public health strategies, and support research and knowledge development efforts in a timely manner.” – Anthony Guerra, InformationWeek

Yahooooo! The new iMacs I ordered at work with the blessing of management have made their way to work and the kids are loving them. I’m amazed how little intervention or introduction these kids needed to learn how to hop on them and start playing the games and surfing the web (parental controls enabled) 🙂

I can’t wait for the electronic material that is targeted to these young diabetic and host it on these machines and provide an avenue to these children. Today’s the second day of operation for these macs and so far approximately 20 kids or so have come across them!

Job well done Apple. Update on the games used and the experiences to follow in another post soon inshallah.

An article my big boss at work wrote about how information technology and eLearning are shaping the future of medicine and healthcare.

“The first ten years of this century has seen dramatic changes in the approachto healthcare brought about largely by the introduction of technology”

Read the full article at: http://healthg20.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/103-108-Behbehani-Beales_2010.pdf

with the many complications of Diabetes and other related chronic conditions, blindness may occur without proper diagnosis and treatment! The good news is that this is preventable with proper follow-up and diagnosis, Kuwait has the Topcon NW-200 devices across Kuwait in their Primary Care clinics, and the services are free to citizens and approx $3 for expatriates!! The bad news is that these devices are not networked in anyway and some lack the financial resources to buy ink-jet prtiner ink!!! This is really sad 😦

With the many Clinical Informatics project we have underway at Dasman Diabetes Institute, I plan to roll-out a solution that will solve this problem once and for all hopefully! Osirix came in highly recommended by my buddies at the Division of Clinical Informatics at Harvard’s Beth Isreal Deconoss Medical Center. I’m meeting with the device reseller here in Kuwait to discuss their plans that they are involved in with the Ministry of Health’s Public Health Department. There might be a possibility of cooperation! SO EXCITED!

Anyone interested to help out? Please do drop me a line if you know how to get a hold of me or leave a comment with your contact details!! Let’s prevent blindness in Kuwait, Let help diabetics and future generations 🙂

Yup, that’s right! These contact lenses will change color when a diabetic patient wears them informing him/her that his/her glucose levels are too low or too high! What an achivement for University of Western Ontario researchers.

” The secret to their contacts are some “extremely small” nanoparticles that are embedded in the hydrogel lenses which, like some similar systems (such as those pictured at right), react to the glucose molecules in tears and cause a chemical reaction that changes the color of the lenses — thereby informing the wearer when their blood sugar is too low or too high.” – Donald Melanson, Engadget

Well, GE has done it for us in a very nice and interactive graphic. It sure is interesting to see how the chart values change with age. Check it out here.

[hat-tip: Medgadget]