Multipath Love from NetApp to Ubuntu

Posted: June 23, 2011 in Computing, Technology
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

YAHOOO! is how I started my tweet when I hit the sweet spot and had a successful installation of Ubuntu Server LTS LucidLynx (10.04.2) 64-Bit at work with our NetApp monster, the FAS3140. The installation was done on an HP ProLiant BL460c G6 Blade Server. The was a success because of the great article and hints from THOGAN.com, so thanks for the support!

Here are the steps for those interested and perhaps didn’t find a clear way of doing it online:

  1. Configure your NetApp storage system with the required Volume, LUN, and from Which aggregate
    • SATA disks from this aggregate were used
    • The encoding of the Volume, LUN and initiator Groups were selected as “Linux”
  2. Make the appropriate zoning between your NetApp storage system and your blade server via the SAN Switch
    • The zoning was done on Brocade switches
  3. When installing your Ubuntu system (LucidLynx (10.04.2) 64-Bit) make sure you do the following:
    • When prompted to select the installation language, hit F6
    • Escape the option and a command-line will appear below the options
    • at the end, type the following      mpath
    • Hit “Enter” and proceed with the installation
  4. You will be warned regarding the installation when configuring the disks, but select “ignore” since it tells you that this is a valid selection for those “who know what they are doing”!
    • At this stage you should be able to see and identify the different paths to the storage system, in our case, we had 4 paths
  5. The system will reboot after the install. Please do reboots and hard-shutdowns to ensure that the multipathing is working appropriately and that your installation has worked as expected.
  6. Once you’re logged in, perform the following commands:
    • sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
    • to bring all packages and the kernel image current. Rebooted afterwards
  • sudo apt-get install multipath-tools multipath-tools-boot 
    • This will download and enable the display of multipathing tools. Rebooted afterwards
  • Now you should be able to view your paths on your fresh Ubuntu machine!
    • sudo mutlipath -l
    • man multipath
    • This will display the manual pages for more detailed descriptions of the various options you can use with multipath

    Hope you find this useful! Please do spread the word around, tweet the article, email it, and share it with all. Let us know how did it go for you!

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    Comments
    1. alsayiegh says:

      Good Job Dari .. I see that linux is becomming as easy as Ms Windows 🙂 of course w/ reliability

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